Fine art flowers photography

frangipani flower - fine art flowers photography

frangipani flower by richard seah

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MY 'BEST' IMAGES
PRAYER IMAGES
thaipusam 2008

THAIPUSAM
THAIPUSAM 2007
THAIPUSAM 2008

CATHOLIC CROSS

VESAK
VESAK 2005
VESAK 2008

PHOTOGRAPHS OF HANDS
art photograph of hands

PHOTOS OF HANDS
PRAYING HANDS
BALI BESSINGS

4 FEET

NIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY
ABSTRACTS
fine art photograph - abstract

ABSTRACT
ABSTRACT II

SURREAL
SURREAL II

ABSTRACT WATER REFLECTIONS

B/W ABSTRACT

THE NATURAL WORLD
PEOPLE
STILL LIFE
buddha image

PICTURE OF BUDDHA

OLD MEDICINE BOTTLES

JOKER MASKS

CANDID STILL LIFE

VEGETABLES
CORN
CARROTS

WALKABOUTS
BLACK & WHITE
black and white photography

BLACK & WHITE

B/W ABSTRACT

FUJIFILM S5 PRO
fuji s5 pro

CHOOSING A DSLR

FUJI S5 PRO

WHY FUJI?

PROS & CONS I

PROS & CONS II

FUJI SUPER CCD

DYNAMIC RANGE

S5 PRO REVIEWS

OTHER EQUIPMENT
SONY DSC R-1

HP 8750 PRINTER

The frangipani flower seems an unlikely subject for fine art flowers photography. It is not a very interesting flower, rather plain, with just five ordinary looking petals.

Of course, it looks nice when pinned to the hair of a beautiful Polynesian girl from Hawaii or Tahiti. But then, is it the girl that looks good, or the flower?

In Singapore, I grew up knowing the frangipani flower as "dead people's flower". That's what some of the Chinese call it, becaus the frangipani tree is commonly planted in cemetaries!

Unlike the lotus flower, rose, tulip. orchid and others, the frangipani flower is a flower that is often over-looked by photographers, especially those in pursuit of fine art flowers photography.

However, I have seen commercial photographers use it effectively, for example, to decorate table settings in food photography.

I took my first frangipani flower pictures in mid-2005. I had gone to the Singapore Botanic Gardens to take pictures of orchids but those pictures did not turn out too well and I would like to go back again sometime.

After the orchids, I was walking around the Gardens when I came across a patch of frangipani trees, featuring frangipani flowers of different colors.

The sun was setting and the light was brilliant. I experimented with shooting the frangipani flower against the light, facing the setting sun. I thought the pictures came out pretty good at least good enough to show and you can view them on my page about flower photography techniques and tips by clicking here.

I would not consider those in the class of fine art flowers photography, however.

The frangipani flower picture on this page, however, I feel qualifies. The original version of this picture was already pretty good. All that it needed, I felt, was a bit of darkening using Photoshop, to make the colors richer and give it a dark, mysterious mood.

That picture of praying hands was taken in the early 1980s and, for a long time, I worried that I might not be able to come up with something better. To my relief, finally I did.

I shot this frangipani flower while taking family outdoor portraits for my friends Tony and Marilyn, on their condominium grounds. I noticed it, aimed my camera and shot on automatic exposure nothing special in terms of fine arts flower photography techniques but, as I have always felt, it is the eye of the photographic artist that matters.

But I was really lucky to have taken this picture because shortly after I snapped it, my friend's daughter plucked the flower. It was no more!

Prints of this frangipani flower are available for sale. Larger prints come in very limited editions, but smaller 5R and 8R prints are made very affordable to encourage the collection of fine art photographs by those with limited budgets.

All prints, including the affordable 5R and 8R prints, are signed by me, Richard Seah.
Click here to view other fine art photographs for sale.